What Is Pelvic Organ Prolapse?

What Is Pelvic Organ Prolapse

When Jenni was 29, she had her first child. A beautiful baby boy, she was ecstatic, and completely in love, despite the long labor she had suffered. But after several weeks, Jenni began to suspect something was wrong. She had expected to feel some discomfort after childbirth, (especially after pushing for several hours), but still, something didn’t feel right.

At her 6-week appointment, her doctor told her everything was looking good, but a few weeks later, Jenni felt a heaviness and in the shower, she felt a small bulge at the opening of her vagina while washing.

“I was horrified,” she said. “I thought something was truly wrong with me.”

Right away, Jenni called her doctor and explained her symptoms.  Her doctor calmly told her she may have a prolapse, a condition where the pelvic floor becomes too weak to hold up the surrounding organs, and caves into itself.

“It’s very common,” he told her, and after an appointment to confirm, he gave her a referral to a women’s health physical therapist.

Jenni’s story is not uncommon. Many women live with pelvic organ prolapse, which is caused by a weakening of the pelvic floor.  Some see symptoms after something like childbirth, but many women may not even realize that they are susceptible until later in life, with the symptoms appear.  

Unfortunately, many women believe this is a normal part of aging, or are too embarrassed to talk to anyone about it, including their doctor. Unlike Jenni, these women suffer in silence and live in discomfort for years, limiting their activities and even their social and personal life because of the symptoms. 

But pelvic organ prolapse is a treatable condition. Read below for answers to some of the most common questions we hear about pelvic organ prolapse. 

What is Pelvic Organ Prolapse anyway?

Before we get into the ins and outs of prolapse, let’s briefly review the pelvic floor and it’s function.  The pelvic floor muscles are a vital part of a woman’s anatomy.  This web of muscles is shaped sort of like a basket and holds up three key organs:  the bladder, rectum, and uterus.  When the tissues and the muscles become too weak, one or more of these organs can fall into the vaginal area, and may even protrude out of the vagina.  This is a pelvic organ prolapse. 

Why does pelvic organ prolapse happen?

Pelvic organ prolapse happens due to a weak pelvic floor. There can be many causes of this, including vaginal childbirth, long-term pressure on your abdomen (from a chronic cough, or straining during a bowel movement), giving birth to a large baby (over 8.5 pounds), aging, or even hormonal changes during menopause.  Sometimes symptoms show up early on, but for many, they may not realize that they have a weak pelvic floor until later in life, when symptoms start progressing. 

What are the symptoms of a pelvic organ prolapse?

The symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse may differ in both type, and severity, depending on how severe the prolapse is.  Many women with pelvic organ prolapse report feeling a general discomfort in the vaginal area.  They may feel a heaviness or pressure, or an achy feeling in the vagina, especially after standing for long periods of time, during sex, or with lots of physical activity.  Some women may also suffer from urinary incontinence. More severe sufferers may see or feel one of their pelvic organs bulging out of the vagina, or have a feeling like they are sitting on a ball 

Is pelvic organ prolapse dangerous?

Pelvic organ prolapse is not a life-threatening condition, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be treated.  Pelvic organ prolapse can cause a lot of physical discomfort, and can negatively impact a person’s quality of life. There are many ways to treat pelvic organ prolapse so there’s no reason anyone should let it go untreated.

How is pelvic organ prolapse diagnosed?

A physician must diagnose pelvic organ prolapse. Because some symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse may disappear when lying down for a physical exam, your doctor may perform different tests to see if they are able to detect the prolapse. Asking you to cough, or performing a pelvic exam while standing in order to see to see the protruding organ are common techniques for detecting pelvic organ prolapse. Your doctor may use other tests too, such as an ultrasound, an MRI scan of the pelvis, or bladder health tests, if you’re experiencing incontinence.

Is pelvic organ prolapse reversible? 

There are many ways to treat pelvic organ prolapse, and in many cases, symptoms can be greatly improved, but pelvic organ prolapse will never go away on its own.

If you’ve recently had a baby and have been diagnosed with pelvic organ prolapse, there is a good chance that your symptoms may improve with time.  Hormones can play a big part of changing the pelvic floor too, so waiting for them to return to normal after baby is born, and after breastfeeding may provide some relief.  In addition, your body takes some time to recover after carrying a baby for 9 months and then giving birth, so you need to allow it time to recover. There is a good chance that with time, and the proper pelvic floor exercises, your symptoms will greatly improve. 

For women who experience pelvic organ prolapse later in life, there are ways to treat it so that your symptoms are not as severe.  But the muscles will never completely return to normal after experiencing a prolapse.

How to fix pelvic organ prolapse

There are many ways to treat pelvic organ prolapse, and choosing which one may depend on the severity of the problem, as well as what life stage you’re in.

Many people with pelvic organ prolapse can benefit from seeing a women’s health physical therapist.  These professionals are trained in dealing with pelvic floor dysfunction and can not only provide guidance on the right exercises to do, but can also guide you in learning how to do them correctly. Things like kegels are often hard to teach, but by using biofeedback machines and other helpful techniques, a PT can guide you through the exercises and ensure they are being done effectively.  Over time, these exercises can strengthen the pelvic floor, providing greater control over bladder leaks, and lessening the uncomfortable symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse. 

In addition to physical therapy, many women choose to use a pessary, a small device that is inserted into the vagina and helps hold up the pelvic organs.  This device is prescribed by a doctor and is typically fitted for each patient in the doctor’s office.  It may take several tries to find the right fit. 

If you suffer from constipation, your doctor may prescribe a special diet designed to help your bowels move more regularly, as straining on the toilet can exacerbate symptoms of a prolapse and make them worse.

Finally, if your symptoms are severe, your doctor may recommend surgery to help hold the organs in place.  Talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of surgery, and the risks associated with this type of procedure. 

(Note: It’s recommended that you wait to have surgery until you’re finished having children, as the benefits of the surgery may be undone with childbirth.) 

It can initially be scary to discover that you have pelvic organ prolapse. But so much can be done to treat the condition that you should never put off discussing the problem with your doctor.   

NAFC has many wonderful physical therapists listed in our doctor finder. If you’re experiencing symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse, visit it here to find a specialist in your area and make an appointment to discuss treatment today!

 

 

Secrets For Aging Gracefully

Secrets For Aging Gracefully

It happens to all of us – one minute we’re prancing around in our 20s and the next we look in the mirror and wonder where the time went. Aging is a fact of life, and one that no one can avoid.

But there are ways to ensure that you sail into your golden years. 

Read on for our best tips on aging gracefully.

Think Young.

It may sound impossible, but research has actually shown that you can think yourself young. A number of studies have shown that we have the power to perceive time differently, and that the more we engage in “can do” thinking as we age, the better off we’ll be. Don’t fall into the mindset of thinking you can’t do something just because you’re a little older. Science shows that if you think you can’t do something, limit your life or the things you try just because of your numerical age, you might actually age faster. But the same is true of the opposite. Think yourself young and you’ll be much better off.  (This is a great article on aging and studies that have been done on perceived time and mindset.)

 

Keep Moving.

Staying young means staying active. Exercise has many benefits and is an important part of keeping your muscles toned, staving off chronic conditions, and keeping your mental state strong. And, regular exercise can actually make you look younger. It’s never too late to start. And you don’t have to suddenly become a body builder or a marathoner to see results. Find a workout you love and stick with it. Walking, swimming, yoga or biking are all great options. Just do something. As is often said, move it or lose it.

 

Eat Well.

Watching what you eat is always important. Healthy eating not only gives helps you maintain a healthy weight, it gives you good energy and helps fight off certain diseases. Many foods can even make you look better! Check out this roundup of some of the best foods you can eat to look younger.

 

Reduce Stress

It’s probably no secret that being stressed out can wreak havoc on your health on both the inside and the outside. Too much stress can lead to things like high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and even diabetes. Stress can also affect your mood, create lack of motivation, cause sleeping problems, and fatigue. Stress may even lead to a higher risk of premature death.

Learn ways to alleviate stress to avoid these health pitfalls.  Meditation and yoga can help calm the mind, and regular exercise can be a great stress reliever. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep to conquer your days, and if you’re really down, give a friend a call to talk through it. It’s amazing what a short conversation with someone you care about can do.

 

Take up a new hobby.

Studies have shown that learning something new can help improve our memory and overall brain health. Not only that, it adds a bit of excitement and spark to life that can keep us fulfilled and happy during our golden years.

Learning something new gives us new perspective on life and opens us up to new experiences.

Need some ideas? Learning a new language, drawing, knitting, learning to play a new instrument, or even just trying out a new recipe are all great places to start.

 

Take proper care of your health.

One of the best ways to stay young is prevention. Take basic care of yourself by making sure to see your doctor and dentist regularly. Stay up to date on your health tests as you age. Get good sleep. Wear sunscreen. These are the little things you do every day that may not seem like much, but can make a big difference in the long term. 


Have any of your own tips on how to stay young? Share them with us in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

Patient Perspective: It Doesn't Matter How Old You Are - Incontinence Is Not Normal!

Patient Perspective: Incontinence Is Not Normal

At 70 years old, you’d think that I’d have come to terms with having incontinence. But time has a way of making you see that some things you thought were normal actually weren’t at all.

The leaks started in my 50’s and at the time, I chalked it up to just growing older. I started wearing absorbent pads for protection and just went on living my life. My leaks started to get worse as I got older, and in my late 60’s I finally talked to my doctor about it. He asked me during a routine check up about my bladder habits and I told him I’d been having leaks for years. I tried to brush it off like it was no big deal (it was a bit embarrassing to talk about), but he kept pressing me, asking me more details and taking notes.

Finally, he told me that he wished I had told him about the leaks sooner, since there is so much that can be done to treat bladder leaks.  He said no one should have to live with bladder control issues and that it absolutely is NOT a normal part of aging.

I felt so foolish for having believed all those years that it was just my body breaking down, getting older. Turns out that I was able to start a medication that really helped eliminate (mostly) my accidents. And there are even more treatments besides medications that I can try if I decide to.

Now that I’ve treated my incontinence, I feel freer at 70 years old than I did when I was in my late 50’s. I only wish I had opened up about it sooner to my doctor. 

Don’t wait to talk about it. Don’t let the years pass you by living with incontinence. It’s just not worth it when so much can be done.

Abby M.,

Boston, MA

Tips For Avoiding A Sedentary Lifestyle

Tips For Avoiding A Sedentary Lifestyle

Today’s modern world moves faster than ever. And while technology has us moving at a breakneck speed in most areas of life, being active is unfortunately not one of them.

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) showed that only 23% of adults between 18 and 64 are getting the recommended amount of exercise. That’s bad news since lack of exercise can lead to lots of problems, including the development of chronic diseases, like diabetes, and cognitive delcline. In addition, a more sedentary lifestyle may lead to obesity, a condition that can contribute to incontinence (among many other things). 

What’s the recommended amount of movement you should be aiming for? Experts say that most people should try to get at least 150 minutes of moderate activity, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week. It’s also recommended to add in muscle-strengthening activities at least twice a week.

The good news is it’s never too late to start. And adding in those workouts may be easier than you think. 


Here are our 7 best ways to sneak more movement into your day:


1. Break up your workouts into chunks.

For starters, don’t feel like you have to do all your working out at once. Even breaking up your workouts into small 10-minute chunks throughout the day counts.  Have a few minutes before your next conference call? Take a walk around the block, or try going up and down the stairs a few times. Running errands? Park your car in the furthest spot from the door to force yourself to walk even just a few more steps. Waiting for the microwave to heat up your dinner? Do 30-60 second bursts of squats or pushups. These activities may not seem like much on their own, but when you add them all up they can really make a difference.

 

2. Start a walking group.

Walking is one of the best low-impact workouts you can do. It’s easy, since you can do it pretty much anywhere, and you don’t really need any equipment – just grab your sneakers and get started. What’s more, walking with a buddy keeps you more engaged throughout the exercise and will make your “workout” as easy as catching up with a friend. (Plus, you’ll get the emotional boost of some good social interaction!). Click here for tips on how to set up a walking group.

 

3. Find an active hobby you love.

Going to the gym not your thing? You don’t have to commit to a grueling workout that you hate. Try something different! Take up a tennis class, try your hand at golfing, or invest in a new bike. There are no hard rules for how you get your workout in, just find a way to move. Bonus:  if you love doing it, you’ll be more inclined to continue.

 

4. Try an alternative workout.

Maybe you’re bored with your normal gym. Or you’re starting to feel unchallenged or unmotivated by what you’ve been doing. There are tons of new gyms out there that focus on new types of workout. Orange Theory, CorePower Yoga, Barre Workouts, Crossfit, Boxing Gyms, or even Dance Centers (tap dancing anyone?) are all different types of workouts that you might consider trying.  Do a google search for what exists in your area and give one of them a call. Many of these gyms offer a free trial period so that you’re able to check it out a few times before committing.


5. Think outside the box.

Try thinking of alternatives to your normal routine in order to work in more exercise. Do you have a standing meeting with a colleague at work? Try turning it into a walking meeting and talk while you walk. Do you live close enough to walk or bike to the grocery store? Make it a habit to schedule that into your weekly routine. Feel like you just really cant squeeze anything in? Try waking up 10 minute early in the morning to fit in a few rounds of weight-bearing exercises or to take a quick walk around the block.


6. Work up to it.

It may feel daunting to jump straight into a workout routine if you’re not used to it. But you don’t have to do it all at once. Start slowly with just a few minutes per day, then work up to more time as you’re able to.  Giving your body (and, let’s face it, your mind) time to catch on may make a regular workout routine easier to stick to.

 

7. Make it a family (or friend) affair.

Working out with a group can be motivating since you’re held more accountable than if you’re just on your own. Try getting your family involved by scheduling in regular family activities.  Start taking a nightly walk after dinner with the kids. Go for hikes on the weekends. Bike to the park and get in a good jungle gym workout. Get a group of friends together to try a new workout class or gym. The best part? By getting your loved ones involved, you’ll be helping each other live a healthier life. And if you have kids, you’ll be instilling in them the importance of exercise and staying fit – something that will hopefully stay with them their whole life.

Finding a workout you can commit to will do more than help you lose weight. Staying active may help prevent chronic conditions, will give you more energy, increase your muscle tone, and help your stability, which can be especially important as you age. And, you’ll be helping your mind stay sharp while also staving off mental conditions like depression.  We’d call those pretty good reasons to make working out a priority.

So get moving! Start small (anything is better than nothing!) and use some of the tips listed above to sneak in extra movement to your day.

(Note: It’s important to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise routine. Need help finding a specialist? Click here to use our specialist locator tool!)

 

Patient Perspective: How I Allowed Incontinence Steal Parts Of My Life.

How I Allowed Incontinence To Steal Parts Of My Life.

I’m 65 years old, and for years I let my incontinence control me.

I always had a bit of an overactive bladder – I’d race to the bathroom as soon as I got home, no matter where I had been or how long I’d been out. Washing dishes after dinner had me almost hopping to the toilet, for fear I’d have a leak.

It was sort of funny at first – well, as funny as we could make it. My kids would make fun of me and we’d laugh about how silly I looked. But after a while, my body just wasn’t strong enough to hold it in and I started not making it to the bathroom in time. I brushed it off for a while – I’d had five kids after all! Wasn’t this something I should expect?

But after a while, it really started to get me down. The small leaks started turning into gushes and I wasn’t able to hide my accidents. I relied on absorbent products but so many of the ones I tried leaked that I became terrified of venturing out of the house.  

I became a hermit – making my kids come to see me at home instead of meeting them out or going to their house.  I missed events – graduations, family outings, get-togethers with friends – things I used to love to do. I was a slave to my incontinence. And I felt helpless.

I finally found help through my daughter. She saw my pain and the big changes in me over the years and finally put her foot down, demanding to take me to talk to my doctor.  It was a terrifying discussion for me – what would she say? Would it make me feel even more embarrassed?

But my doctor was very kind, and started me on a medication for OAB right away, which helped a lot. 

She also referred me to a physical therapist to help strengthen my pelvic floor.  I thought it would be extremely uncomfortable, but it’s left me feeling so much stronger and empowered, I kick myself that I didn’t start it sooner.  

I’ve regained so much control over my condition and my life now. I wish I had sought help sooner.

I’m likely an extreme case – I don’t think most people – even those with incontinence – live like I did.  But here is my challenge to anyone living with incontinence – why let it dictate your life even a little? If you’re struggling with little leaks here and there, don’t put off treatment or brush it off like it’s nothing. Packing an extra change of clothes, scouting out bathrooms, making excuses – these are changes to your life that may start off small, but can snowball into something larger if you don’t seek help and take care of it now.

Find a doctor you trust, and get treatment for your leaks. Don’t let incontinence hold you back from living your life. It’s just not worth it.

Sandra F., Minneapolis, MN

pee when you...laugh, sneeze, cough, workout, have sex….? You’re not alone. Learn about a new option to treat Stress Urinary Incontinence.

Stress Urinary Incontinence Treatment

Stress Urinary Incontinence, the type of incontinence that happens when you exert any type of pressure on your bladder or pelvic floor, happens to millions of American women. The pesky leaks can show up unexpectedly, whether you’re laughing at your best friends joke, or doing a jumping jack in your Tuesday morning workout class.

Peeing your pants something that almost no one wants to admit to. But unfortunately it happens a to a lot of us. And, even worse, many women choose to do nothing about it, chalking it up to a normal part of getting older. 

So let’s set the record straight – bladder leakage is not a right of passage as we age, nor is it something that you should live with. It’s a medical condition that deserves to be treated, because while it might be common, wetting yourself regularly is not normal. 

There are many things that can contribute to SUI. Anytime the pelvic floor is weakened or compromised it can cause the muscles to be a bit lax, making it harder for you to hold in urine.  A common cause is, of course, childbirth – especially if you delivered vaginally.  The mere act of carrying a baby around for nine months and then delivering it can make your muscles weak and even cause some nerve or tissue damage that make you more prone to leaks.

But other things can cause damage too – being overweight puts extra pressure on the pelvic floor, causing it to weaken.  As does having a chronic cough (commonly seen in long-time smokers). And any other type of surgery that may have touched the pelvic floor may make you more susceptible.

Our pelvic floor does also naturally weaken a bit as we age. Most people don’t pay much attention to their pelvic floors, which can cause problems later in life.

The pelvic floor is a muscle, and like any other muscle in the body, it needs to be strengthened in order for it to do its job. If you’ve had damage to the pelvic floor at some point in your life, like during childbirth, you may have already put it in a state of weakness, even if you didn’t immediately have any problems like incontinence.

But without treating it, gravity can continue to weaken the pelvic floor and can lead to things like incontinence, or other types of pelvic floor disorders.

All that being said, it’s important to note that while incontinence may happen more often when we’re older, it can strike anyone at any age. New moms may be just as susceptible to experiencing bladder leaks as someone who gave birth 30 years ago. 

The good news is there are many options to treat it. One of the newest options is a product called INNOVO.

INNOVO

INNOVO: A new product for Stress Urinary Incontinence 

New to the scene is a product from Atlantic Therapeutics called INNOVO.  INNOVO is the first wearable, active and truly non-invasive solution to treat stress urinary incontinence. INNOVO is cleared by the FDA, and provides women a safe, clinically effective solution that treats the root cause, not just the symptoms of bladder weakness.

How it works.

INNOVO’s Multipath technology delivers 180 gentle pulses, strengthening the pelvic floor during each 30-minute session.

The device is cleverly hidden in a pair of easy-to-slip on shorts that deliver 180 pulses to stimulate muscle contraction. INNOVO shorts are comfortable and are made of breathable, skin-friendly material, which come in a range of sizes.

INNOVO is highly effective. It’s been proven to clinically treat SUI when used for 30 minutes a day, five days a week for 12 weeks. In fact, 80% of users found that INNOVO significantly improved their quality of life. After just 4 weeks, 80% of INNOVO users saw significant improvement and after 12 weeks of use, 87% of reported being dry or nearly dry.

The best part? You’re able to use INNOVO in the comfort of your own home.

INNOVO is now available! Talk to your doctor or PT about this innovative new product and learn how you can start using it to address Stress Urinary Incontinence.

Learn more about INNOVO here.


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Patient Perspective: My Husband Doesn't Understand My Incontinence

Patient Perspective: My Husband Doesn’t Understand My Incontinence

Are you like me? Do you live with someone who is unable to deal with your incontinence? I am sad to say that I do, and while it hasn’t always been easy, I’m starting to find ways to help my husband accept my problem. 

We’ve always been a carefree couple. Even in our early days we’d drop everything at a moments notice if a cheap flight to an exotic destination came along. We’d host impromptu parties with friends, go on vacations with other couples, and push ourselves to try new things like running marathons or participating in intense group workouts or races. 

And while we are still very much in love, and still like to be adventurous, in recent years, I’ve held back, because I suffer from incontinence.

I started noticing leaks when I was in my early 40’s. At first they were small, and didn’t happen very often. I brushed them off and still tried to do all the things we always had, without feeling the need to share this new development with my husband.

But after a while, the small leaks turned to bigger ones, and they were happening more and more frequently. I found that I couldn’t go out of the house without packing a spare change of clothes. I no longer wanted to just hop on a 5-hour flight to somewhere exotic where I wasn’t sure I’d be able to find a bathroom, or worse, have an accident on the plane.  

I had to tell my husband what was happening, and while he was supportive, he didn’t understand why I couldn’t “just hold it”.  He started to grow resentful as I declined more and more invitations, and we soon began to have fights about it, often leaving me feeling ashamed and embarrassed because of my condition.

I decided that I needed to take matters into my own hands and help my husband understand. We started doing research together online and learned more about my condition, what causes it, and ways to better manage it.  And, I’ve talked with my doctor about ways to treat my incontinence so that I can do more of the things I love. 

It hasn’t been easy, and my husband still sometimes gets frustrated at my hesitation to do some of the things we used to, but educating ourselves, together, was one of the best things we could have done to get back on track. It’s helped us both learn that this is not my fault, and that there are ways to overcome it. And, despite his frustration, I’m glad my husband is pushing me to get treatment instead of hiding behind my condition. I’m confident that with my doctor’s help, I’ll soon be able to get back to many of the things that we used to enjoy, and can’t wait to feel like my old self again. 

Sylvie R., Rockport, Massachusetts

What Is A Pessary And Do I Need One?

What Is A Pessary And Do I Need One?

If you have incontinence, or a pelvic organ prolapse, you’ve likely heard the term “pessary” tossed around at some point.  Pelvic organ prolapse is a condition in which your pelvic floor becomes weak or compromised – sometimes due to age, sometimes due to trauma (like childbirth), causing one or more of your pelvic organs to collapse into the vagina. Pelvic organ prolapse can be mild, or severe, and symptoms can vary greatly depending on the severity. Some women may not even realize they have a prolapse until later in life.  Symptoms can include pressure or a feeling of heaviness in the vagina, incontinence, or even pain.

While some women can see big improvements in their condition with physical therapy, the condition cannot truly be “fixed” without surgery.  But, it is possible to manage pelvic organ prolapse by using a pessary. 

A pessary is a medical device, typically made out of silicone that is placed in the vagina and is used to support the pelvic floor, and the bladder, uterus and rectum.  Pessaries are not a one-size-fits all type of device. Everyone is different so your doctor will usually fit you for one that works for you. This may take a few tries, so don’t get discouraged if the first one you try doesn’t feel quite right.  Just be open with your doctor and work with them until you get the right fit.

Once you’ve found the right fit, your doctor will train you on how to insert and remove the device.  You’ll also learn how to care for your pessary, which will require weekly or biweekly cleansing.   

Pessaries can be a great solution for women with pelvic organ prolapse, or bladder incontinence, who don’t want to consider surgery (or are not quite ready for surgery yet).  It works by “holding up” the organs that may have collapsed into the vagina, relieving many of the side effects of a prolapse, such as the feeling of pressure or heaviness in the vagina, or incontinence.   

If you think you may be a good candidate for a pessary, talk to your doctor. They can review the pros and cons and help get you fitted for one.  It’s a great option for those experiencing symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse, and can provide great relief without undergoing surgery.

 

What Causes Incontinence In Women?

What Causes Incontinence In Women_.jpg

Incontinence is a condition that affects over 25 million men and women in America. It can really happen to anyone, and can be caused by many different things. But it is much more common in women – nearly twice as common actually – and unfortunately has become something that many people (even potentially your doctor) brush off as being a normal part of aging. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

Why Is Incontinence More Prevalent In Women?

Incontinence can have many root causes.  Being overweight, problems with the prostate in men, and even conditions that cause damage to the nerves, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, or even diabetes can all lead to incontinence.  But it’s no secret that women suffer from incontinence more than men. This is in part due to the fact that things like pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause are unique to women and create extra pressure and complications that can cause incontinence. 

The pressure of carrying a baby for 9 months and the trauma of childbirth to the pelvic floor can weaken the pelvic floor, making it difficult to stay continent.  Additionally the hormonal changes that occur during menopause cause a change in continence.  A decrease in estrogen can cause the vaginal tissues to become less elastic and dry and can lead to incontinence and urinary tract infections.

What Types Of Incontinence Are There 

Did you know that there are actually different types of Incontinence? Depending on what you have, there may be different options available to you.

Urge Incontinence

Urge incontinence is the frequent and urgent need to use the bathroom, accompanied by bladder leakage.  You may have a sudden feeling that you have to go to the bathroom right now, or it may be triggered by familiar things, such as arriving home, washing the dishes, etc. This type of condition may also exist without bladder leakage, and is then referred to as Overactive Bladder. 

Stress Urinary Incontinence

Stress urinary incontinence happens when pressure is placed on the bladder and causes bladder leakage. This type of leakage might happen when you’re working out, or even when you sneeze or laugh. Unlike Urge incontinence, stress urinary incontinence is not typically accompanied by the sensation of a sudden urge to urinate. Rather, stress urinary incontinence is caused by a weakened pelvic floor, and/or a weak sphincter muscle.  Stress urinary incontinence often occurs in women (although men can have it too), and typically as a result of pregnancy and childbirth. It’s a condition that can get worse as you get older, since we lose pelvic muscle tone as we age. Luckily, there are many treatment options available, and behavioral modifications, such as learning how to create a healthy pelvic floor, can do wonders for this type of incontinence.

Mixed Incontinence

As the name implies, many women can suffer from both Stress Urinary Incontinence, and Urge Incontinence, although one is typically more severe than others. Treatment options for mixed incontinence are typically the same as the treatments you would use for stress urinary incontinence, or urge incontinence.

What Are My Options?

Luckily, there are many treatment options available for the various types of incontinence women tend to have.  Below are just a few treatment options available.

Behavioral Modifications.

Often, simple changes to our lifestyle, including changes to our diet and exercise regimen, can ease a lot of the symptoms of incontinence in women.  Learning the foods and drinks that irritate the bladder, and knowing how to strengthen the core and pelvic floor muscles can do a great deal to help reduce or even eliminate symptoms.

 Absorbents

Absorbent products come in all shapes and sizes and are a great option for those who need some extra protection. Read our guide to finding the right absorbent product for you.

 Medications

There are many types of medications available that can sooth an irritable bladder. These medications typically work by relaxing the muscles around the bladder, or stopping the signal to your bladder that you need to go right now!

Procedures

If medications and behavioral modification don’t work for you, there are several options that you may want to try before you think about surgery. Many women have seen success with botox injections into their bladder (it’s not just for wrinkles!), and different forms of neuromodulation, small pulses that stimulate the nerves involved in controlling the bladder.  Learn more about these options here.

Surgery

Finally surgery can be a good option for those who have tried other treatments without success. There are several types of surgical procedures, including urinary diversion, sling procedures, and augmentation cystoplasty, that can help with incontinence in women.

It’s important to note that no treatment is 100% effective all the type. Talk with your doctor about what you can expect with each treatment, as well as the pros and cons associated with them.

Urinary incontinence can have a big impact on a woman’s life and it’s important to get it treated.  Too many women live with symptoms of urinary incontinence, thinking it’s just a normal part of aging. But there are many treatments available and it can make life so much more enjoyable when you’re not looking for a bathroom or worried about having an accident. 

If you live with urinary incontinence, make an appointment with your doctor to talk about treatment options.  

Patient Perspective: Overcoming Overactive Bladder

Overcoming Overactive Bladder

When I was in my early forties, I suddenly found myself rushing to the bathroom constantly. The urge would strike without warning causing me to sprint there lest I want to have an accident everywhere. It wasn’t too big of a deal when I was at home – I was typically able to make it to a bathroom, but when I was in an unfamiliar place, I’d feel panicked until I knew where every toilet in the place was, just in case I needed to make a mad dash to one.

I had been at stay at home mom for the last several years, caring for my youngest daughter, but when she finally started school, I decided it was time to return to the working world. But first, I resolved to get my bladder under control – I didn’t want to be rushing from meeting to meeting with important clients with the fear of peeing my pants.

I visited my doctor and found out that I had Overactive Bladder. It’s where your bladder has sudden spasms that cause you to feel the need to empty it – even if you just went. He prescribed a medication, which helped a lot and made me feel more confident as I returned to work. I’m now exploring a procedure involving nerve stimulation that is supposed to be even more effective and won’t require me to take medications every day. 

I’m so happy I got this treated before returning to work, and wish I would have done it sooner! It would have made heading to the park with my daughter much less daunting! Don’t wait to see a doctor if you have OAB. Turns out there are lots of things that you can do to treat this common (but not normal!) problem.

 

Jane F.

Portland, OR

                                     

How To Manage Leaks During And After Pregnancy

How To Manage Leaks During And After Pregnancy

You're expecting and you couldn't be happier! There's literally a mini-you baking in the oven and you feel proud, excited, and even nervous about it. However, now the phrase, "you're expecting", has taken on a new meaning. Sure, you're expecting a baby, but you also may begin to throw up at random times, crave things you've never desired before, and even leak a little after a sneeze. Nobody told you that you should be expecting all of that!

You're able to get past the sleepless nights and aches and pains, but these leaks, they're not your thing. However, this too shall pass. In the meantime, you can implement a few techniques and products to make it a little more bearable.

What's Up With These Leaks?

A woman's body goes through A LOT while carrying a baby! The uncomfortable experiences are the body's way of adapting for the baby and preparing for childbirth. I mean, we've got to expect a little discomfort with a baby growing and organs shifting to make room for it, right?

Stressed Out Sphincter

You can thank your expanding uterus for putting pressure on the bladder and making you spritz when you walk, talk, laugh and sneeze. This extra pressure on your bladder is known as stress incontinence and this happens when the bladder sphincter doesn't function well enough to hold in urine.

Hormones Going Haywire

Hormones play a big part too. Relaxin is a hormone that relaxes your muscles in preparation for labor. Progesterone is also released to soften your ligaments. The result? A pelvic floor that's looser and softer, which leads to less control of your bladder.

Bladder Spazzes and Spritz

Are you frequenting the ladies room more often than usual? Then you might have an overactive bladder. This happens when the bladder starts uncontrollably spazzing out and it's a common condition for pregnant women.

Can I Do Anything About It?

The short answer is yes, you can do something about it. However, what you do about it might not actually stop the leaks. It's one of those things that you can't 100 percent control. However, there are things you can do to help manage it during your pregnancy.

Kegel exercises are helpful before, during and after pregnancy. Doing just a few sets of 20-30 Kegel exercises a day can help whip your pelvic floor muscles into shape. Keep in mind, a stronger pelvic floor can better support your uterus and bladder, which could mean fewer leaks.  Plus, they'll come in handy when it's time to give birth! However, before you decide to implement anything new, like Kegel exercises, be sure to consult with your doctor first.

You're probably tempted to cut back on your water intake but that's not a good idea. Ensure you're getting the recommended amount of water each day. Otherwise, you could wind up with dehydration or an unpleasant UTI.

Could your diet be irritating your bladder? It's certainly possible. Ditch the soda pops, coffee (sorry!), tomatoes, and citrus stuff.

Products Can Help You, Too

One way to keep your leaks to yourself is by using pads, but not just any kind of pads. If you're tempted to grab one of your menstrual pads that have been stashed away for a while, please don't. They might look like they can get the job done but they won't. Menstrual pads are great for absorbing menstrual flow but not the rapid output of urine. Instead, look into bladder control pads. They're much more comfortable and offer better protection. Bladder control pads are designed to control odor, keep you dry, and let you remain discreet about your leaks.

Using a Product is Okay

A lot of women are embarrassed about bladder leakage and don't discuss options with friends or their doctor. Others feel like a few leaks aren't that big of a deal. No matter how you feel about it, you don't have to just deal with it. Doing a few Kegels and wearing a bladder control pad as a backup is a great strategy for managing leaks.

Growing a human being inside of you is going to cause a lot of physical and hormonal changes that you may or may not expect. However, one thing you can expect is to have options to make those pesky leaks a little more bearable!

What are you currently doing about leaks? Tell us about it in the comments!


This Post was brought to you by Lily Bird

Lily Bird is for all women with leaky laughs and dribble dilemmas. We squeeze when we sneeze and drip when we jump. And we think it's high time we stop saying sorry for the spritz. We provide a hassle-free monthly subscription service for bladder leak products as well as free tips and tricks for women to take control of leaks via The Chirp.

5 Home Remedies For UTIs

5 Home Remedies For Urinary Tract Infections - Image Of Cranberries

We get it. UTI’s are annoying and frustrating, especially if they’re recurrent.  The last thing you want to do is take time out of your busy day to visit your doctor for an antibiotic.

While antibiotics are the fastest and most recommended way to treat a UTI, there are some home remedies you can try to treat the condition. 

Below are 5 things you can try to treat a UTI on your own.

  1. Drink Lots Of Water. Drinking lots of water, and emptying your bladder when you need to, will help you flush harmful bacteria from your system. You may be hesitant to drink water due to the burning sensation you may have when peeing, but trust us on this – getting in your recommended 8 glasses a day will do you a world of good.

  2. Try Unsweetened Cranberry Juice. While the research is a bit unclear, cranberries have been used as prevention of UTI for generations. Studies have shown that cranberries actually make it harder for the bacteria that causes UTIs to stick to the urinary tract walls. So, while not really a remedy, if you frequently get UTIs, it might be worth drinking a couple of glasses of unsweetened cranberry juice, or snacking on the actual fruit (whole or dried).

  3. Don’t “Hold It”. We all get busy, but holding off going to the bathroom gives any bacteria that may already be in your bladder the chance to grow and multiply, potentially resulting in an infection (or keeping one that you already have alive and well). Drink lots of water and when you have to go, go.

  4. Try taking a probiotic. Introducing a probiotic to your system may help to replenish naturally occurring bacteria that live in the vagina, which can help fight off the bad bacteria that causes a UTI and restore the balance.

  5. Eat garlic. It turns out that garlic doesn’t just ward off vampires. A recent study showed that garlic extract may be effective in reducing the bacteria that causes UTIs.

Have you tried any of the above, or other home treatments to treat your UTI? Tell us about them in the comments below!

Patient Perspective: How Acknowledging My Pelvic Floor Changed My Life

How Acknowledging My Pelvic Floor Changed My Life. Pelvic Strengthening

I’ve experienced bladder leaks for about 5 years. After I had my second daughter, I started noticing leakage here and there. I always assumed it would go away, but it never did. I spent the first year attributing it all to childbirth, and let’s be honest, I didn’t really have the time to worry about myself much with a newborn baby. But, after my daughter’s first year, what I thought was a problem that would clear up on it’s own continued, and I began to take more notice. The leaks were more frequent, not less, and I started to feel ashamed about it. I’d never heard any of my friends talking about this side effect of motherhood – why was it happening to me?

I finally decided to visit my OB/Gyn to see what he recommended and he referred me to a Physical Therapist who solely focuses on the pelvic floor (yes! there really is such a thing!). The PT did a thorough evaluation and said the cause of my problem was due to a weakened pelvic floor that most likely occurred during childbirth.

I’ve never been what you would call athletic. I have a gym membership but don’t visit all that often. I sit at work all day, and get most of my exercise running around after my two girls. And God knows I could stand to lose a bit more of the baby weight.  So when my PT said that she was going to put me on a workout program to get things back in shape, I was a bit worried. But her workout was low intensity – lots of walking to get my weight down (which would help put less pressure on my bladder and pelvic floor) and simple exercises that would strengthen not just my pelvic floor, but my core muscles too.

After 3 months of doing the workout I had lost about 8 pounds and my stomach and glut muscles were noticeably more toned. I also was noticing much fewer leaks and was able to control my bladder much better than before. And after 6 months of performing the workout, the leaks had stopped all together.

I can’t tell you what a difference this simple workout routine has made in my life – not only do I feel stronger and more in control, but it’s given me more confidence in the ability to change my body both in look and in function. I’m so proud of myself and my only regret is that I didn’t do something sooner. Ladies – if you’re experiencing bladder leaks, visit a PT and get on a workout program! It will literally change your life. It did for me!

Kimberly V., Englewood, CO

Why A Healthy Pelvic Floor Is Important

Why A Healthy Pelvic Floor Is Important

Why A Healthy Pelvic Floor Is Important

Why The Pelvic Floor Is Important

If you follow along with NAFC on a regular basis, you know how much importance we place on maintaining a strong and healthy pelvic floor. It’s a vital part of maintaining continence, alleviating symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse, and even reducing lower back pain. And don’t get us started on the benefits a strong pelvic floor has on sexual intercourse. It’s no wonder we focus so much on this magic group of muscles!

The pelvic floor is essentially a web of muscles that acts kind of like a basket holding up some pretty vital organs: the bladder, bowel and uterus.  When these muscles become weakened – from things like childbirth, heavy lifting, chronic coughing; basically anything that puts a lot of pressure on it - it can cause a loss of bladder or bowel control and can increase the risk of prolapse.  Weak pelvic floor muscles can also put strain on other muscles (the pelvic floor is connected to many other muscles in the body!) causing them to work overtime to make up for the lack of support in the pelvic floor. This imbalance can cause pain in other areas of the body too (lower back pain or hip pain for instance).

For these reasons, it’s important to make sure you’re incorporating pelvic floor and core exercises into your workouts each day. And don’t worry – the workouts don’t have to be long or strenuous. But just like every other muscle in the body, they need attention in order to maintain the strength needed to function properly. 

So, how do you get a strong pelvic floor? Some simple, daily exercises are all you need. We’ve teamed up with the folks at Carin to help you get started. Read below for information to how NAFC readers can get a free Carin Wearable Set

What is Carin?

Carin’s smart underwear is a new way to not only measure and manage leaks, but also to improve your pelvic floor strength so that you can get on with your life and eliminate those pesky leaks all together. It’s the only wearable pelvic floor exerciser on the market – painless, noninvasive, and high-tech. 

Carin Smart Underwear Set

Carin Smart Underwear Set

What’s Included in the Carin Smart Underwear Set?

Carin comes complete with a unique pair of highly absorbent underwear that can manage any leaks you may have. The set also comes with a sensor that snaps in the underwear, detects your body movement and monitors leakage. Finally, the Carin app helps you track your leaks and also sets you up on a daily workout plan to help you get stronger and manage leaks.

Carin Sensor

Carin Sensor

Carin App

Carin App

How Does It Work?

The Carin exercise program contains two parts: a weekly measuring routine and a daily exercise routine. The Carin smart underwear is worn for at least 24 hrs. with the sensor snapped in. This is the ‘measuring day’. The sensor will detect the body’s movements and track any leakage that might occur. Based on leakage, the app will then begin to recommend specific exercise routines to help you strengthen your pelvic floor in an effort to reduce leaks. There is a weekly plan of video exercises ready for you to do for 10 minutes each day. 

After the second time of wearing the smart underwear, an intelligent algorithm calculates progress made within the Carin app. The app shows the impact of exercise by counting the reduction of leaks.  80% of women using Carin have reported seeing progress between 20% to 100% in as little as 4 weeks!

 


See Carin In Action

Want a sneak peak of what to expect with Carin? Watch the video below!

Don't Quit Exercising Because Of Urinary Incontinence

Working Out With Incontinence

Living with incontinence can pose many challenges. The condition can cause you to limit the life you once had - foregoing social events, distancing yourself from family and friends, and even missing days of work. So, it comes as no surprise that your workouts may also be affected. In fact, studies have shown that up to 20% of women have reported quitting their physical activities due to incontinence. Experiencing leakage when running or doing certain types of exercise is very common, but it’s not normal. You shouldn’t have to live with incontinence, and the good news is you don’t have to.

Why do I leak urine during my workouts?

Bladder leakage during your workout is due to a condition called Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI).  SUI is incontinence that occurs when you have a weak pelvic floor or sphincter muscle, and increased pressure is placed on your bladder. This can happen with things like sneezing, coughing, and, yes, certain forms of working out.

SUI occurs commonly with childbirth, but other conditions can also contribute to the condition. Chronic coughing, surgical procedures, menopause, and obesity can also contribute to SUI.

How To Manage Bladder Leakage During Exercise

The tips listed below can help you manage and treat the issue of bladder leaks. As always, when thinking about treatment options, it’s best to consult a trained physical therapist that can give you a proper examination. 

1. Strengthen Your Pelvic Floor.         

A weak pelvic floor can make you more susceptible to SUI. To learn how to strengthen it, make an appointment with a physical therapist who will teach you not only how to correctly perform a kegel, but also how to strengthen your whole core. You see, while the pelvic floor is important, it’s only one part of the equation. Your core muscles, hips, thighs, and glutes all play a part of maintaining proper alignment so it’s important to include these muscles in your daily workouts too.

Your PT will also teach you how to properly relax your pelvic floor. Pelvic floor muscles that are too tight can also be an issue with SUI, so you must learn to relax these muscles as well.

2.  Use a Pessary.

SUI often occurs in women who have experienced Pelvic Organ Prolapse. A pessary can be a great tool for this condition, especially when working out, since it helps hold everything in place, resulting in less pressure on your bladder.

3. Use Protection.

It goes without saying that if you’re experiencing leaks and want to continue to work out, you may need a little extra help. There are several absorbent products available that are designed specifically for working out. Experiment with different styles and fits to see what works for you.

4. Go Easy On The Fluids.

You should make sure you stay properly hydrated, but try limiting the amount of caffeinated beverages you’re drinking, especially before your workout. Caffeine can irritate the bladder making accidents more likely.

5. Watch What You Eat.

Similar to caffeine, certain foods can cause bladder irritation in some people. Spicy or acidic foods are especially common bladder irritants and should be avoided.

6. Empty Your Bladder Before Starting Your Workout.

Make sure to use the bathroom just before any strenuous workout, like running to avoid extra strain on your bladder.

7. Try Retraining Your Bladder

Just like any muscle in the body, your bladder can be trained. Try scheduling your bathroom visits in intervals and slowly work up to longer stretches of time.

8. Wear Black Pants.

This is a simple trick, but can help you prevent (or at least cover up) any embarrassing leaks. The color black can help hide any leaks. Loose fitting clothing can also help hide any extra protection that you may be using to prevent leakage.

As you can see, there are several options for managing urine leakage while exercising. Try incorporating some of the above tips and don’t let incontinence keep you from getting your work out! 

Have you tried any of the tips above, or do you have others you’d like to share? Tell us about them in the comments below!


SUI Treatment tracker

SUI Treatment tracker

Sign up to receive the SUI Treatment Tracker!

Have you started treatment for SUI? Sign up to receive our SUI Treatment Tracker and keep track of your progress! This 6 week program will help keep you on track and will help determine how your treatment is working.


Life After Leaving The Closet

Six months ago I announced that I was ‘coming out of the closet’ regarding my health issue with Pelvic Organ Prolapse. Today I’m back to share how that decision has improved my life.

After dealing with POP symptoms for what seemed like an eternity, I finally decided to seek answers to my questions concerning this health condition. It took a fair amount of courage to face the fact that I needed help. It wasn’t an easy decision by any means because I tried to tell myself it was just part of the aging process and I would just have to ‘deal with it’ the best I could.

I’m here to tell you, that isn’t the case. No woman needs to suffer in silence or hide their health issues in a closet. I totally understand how reluctant some women are to talk about or be treated for this health issue. I grew up in the era when women’s health issues weren’t openly discussed among peers, but were generally relegated to a dark closet. However, times have changed and although some may not know it, there is hope and help for those who suffer with this malady. New treatment options occur on a daily basis that allows women to control, improve and repair this cryptic health condition. It’s time to openly discuss women’s health issues.

Although I tried to keep up with a daily exercise program prior to surgery, it became difficult because of the pressure and pain I was experiencing. Because of this I gained an extra 15 pounds in a very short period of time. It was a very depressing time for me. But, after the brief recovery from surgery in January I was once again able to exercise and follow a simple diet that resulted in my losing 22 pounds by mid-March.

My life today is one-hundred percent better than it was prior to my surgery. I can go for walks, out to dinner, and shopping without having to worry about what might happen.  If you suffer from Pelvic Organ Prolapse I encourage you to not hide in a closet or allow it define how you live your life. Take charge of your health. After all, there is a better life after leaving the closet!

Betty Heath

Did you miss Betty's original article about her surgery? Read it here!


betty+heath.jpg

About The Author:  Betty Heath lives in Colorado with her husband. She is “retired from work, but not from living”, and has a weekly column called “As I See It”, which appears each Sunday in the Longmont Times-Call, owned by the Denver Post. She enjoys writing, cooking, gardening, and quilting. Betty also volunteers in the St. Vrain Valley School District, helping students learn how to write from their heart. For the past six years, she and her husband have volunteered as Santa and Mrs. Claus for the Holiday Festival in the Carbon Valley. You can read more from Betty at her blog, The Rejoicing Soul.

Six Things To Try Before You Visit Your Doctor For Incontinence

6 Things To Try Before You Visit Your Doctor For Incontinence

6 Things To Try Before You Visit Your Doctor For Incontinence

Whether you’ve just started experiencing bladder leaks, or have been dealing with them for a while, knowing how to manage incontinence can be difficult.  And even if you’ve scheduled an appointment to see your doctor, there are things you can do before speaking with him or her to start treating the problem.

This week we’re focusing on management techniques that don’t require a visit to your doctor. NAFC has a great guide on the website that will walk you through the steps of management and things to try to control bladder leaks. Check out all the steps below:

Step 1: Finding products to help you stay clean and dry

Step 2: Assess Your Condition

Step 3: Measure Your Pelvic Floor Strength

Step 4: Pelvic Floor Exercises

Step 5: Develop A Voiding Strategy

Step 6: Get Professional Help

It is possible that by performing the steps above, you may be able to reduce or even eliminate your symptoms on your own. At the very least, it will give you some good information to share with your doctor and your initial efforts will help them to get you on a course to a successful treatment plan.

Stay with us this week as we provide more tips on how to manage bladder leaks! 

Access the full guide above here, or download our printed brochure with the above tips from our Resource Center!

It's Bladder Health Awareness Month, 2017!

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Hello Readers!

Each year, NAFC, along with several other health organizations, celebrates Bladder Health Awareness Month by raising awareness of the many conditions that can affect the bladder and how to treat it. This is an important month for NAFC – while we touch many people each day, it’s estimated that over 25 million Americans live with incontinence. And many of those people wait years before even having a conversation with their doctor about treatment options. It’s a debilitating condition that can cause shame, embarrassment, isolation and depression for those it touches, and, unfortunately, it is widely (and incorrectly) thought to be a condition that people should just accept as they get older. This couldn’t be further from the truth and this month, it’s our chance to shine the spotlight on the condition and show people that living with incontinence is no way to live.

So, what can you expect this month from NAFC? A lot!

Here’s a rundown of how we’re doing our part to stop the stigma:

Life Without Leaks Awareness Campaign.

NAFC launched the Life Without Leaks Campaign earlier in 2017 and it’s still going strong! Designed to show men and women of all ages that they don’t have to live with bladder leaks, this campaign sheds light on the effects of incontinence and shows people that by not treating their incontinence, they may be missing out on the best parts of their life. Life is possible without leaks. Check out the campaign here.

Blog Series: The Lifecycle of Incontinence.

This series will break down the stages of incontinence, from learning to accept you have the condition, to a description of the many treatment options available to you. Follow along on the BHealth Blog each week as we discuss the following topics:

  • Week 1: Learning To Accept You Have Incontinence
  • Week 2: What You Can Do To Manage Your Condition Before You See Your Doctor.
  • Week 3: How To Talk To Your Doctor About Incontinence
  • Week 4: Your Guide To Treatment Options.

BE STRONG Classes. 

Our BE STRONG classes are designed to show you the many benefits of maintaining a strong and healthy pelvic floor. All of our classes are taught by Pelvic Floor Specialists and are a great way for you to learn more about this vital group of muscles. Find one in your area!

How You Can Get Involved

Follow Us On Facebook and Twitter – and help us raise awareness! 

Not only will you be able to follow along with everything that’s happening this month, you can help us raise awareness by liking and sharing our posts. Better yet – post our Bladder Health Facts to your own pages! Be sure to tag us with the hashtags #LifeWithoutLeaks and #BHealth!

Make A Donation To NAFC. 

We love doing what we do. And we make a pretty big impact, reaching over 1,000,000 people each year who need our help.

But we can’t do it alone.

Support from our readers is the only way we’re able to continue offering the education and community we’ve created on nafc.org. It’s how we’re able to continue creating free courses for your local communities. It’s how we’re able to advocate for patients in home and at assisted care facilities for quality incontinence supplies. It’s how we provide thousands of free educational brochures to patients looking for help. And it’s how we are able to increase the awareness of the impact of incontinence on those it touches. Donate today to help us ensure everyone has access to these free materials, and can learn how to live a #LifeWithoutLeaks.

Start A Fundraiser On Facebook! 

We know sometimes it’s hard to give. But if you’re passionate about our cause and want to help, consider setting up a fundraiser for us on Facebook. It’s super easy to do and all the funds come straight to NAFC. Read our step-by-step instructions on how to do it here.  With #GivingTuesday coming up on the 28th of this month, it’s a great time to get this going.

So there you have it!  We hope you’ll follow along with us this month to learn more about incontinence and help support us throughout the month to increase awareness of Bladder Health! 

Sincerely,

The National Association For Continence