Secrets For Aging Gracefully

Secrets For Aging Gracefully

It happens to all of us – one minute we’re prancing around in our 20s and the next we look in the mirror and wonder where the time went. Aging is a fact of life, and one that no one can avoid.

But there are ways to ensure that you sail into your golden years. 

Read on for our best tips on aging gracefully.

Think Young.

It may sound impossible, but research has actually shown that you can think yourself young. A number of studies have shown that we have the power to perceive time differently, and that the more we engage in “can do” thinking as we age, the better off we’ll be. Don’t fall into the mindset of thinking you can’t do something just because you’re a little older. Science shows that if you think you can’t do something, limit your life or the things you try just because of your numerical age, you might actually age faster. But the same is true of the opposite. Think yourself young and you’ll be much better off.  (This is a great article on aging and studies that have been done on perceived time and mindset.)

 

Keep Moving.

Staying young means staying active. Exercise has many benefits and is an important part of keeping your muscles toned, staving off chronic conditions, and keeping your mental state strong. And, regular exercise can actually make you look younger. It’s never too late to start. And you don’t have to suddenly become a body builder or a marathoner to see results. Find a workout you love and stick with it. Walking, swimming, yoga or biking are all great options. Just do something. As is often said, move it or lose it.

 

Eat Well.

Watching what you eat is always important. Healthy eating not only gives helps you maintain a healthy weight, it gives you good energy and helps fight off certain diseases. Many foods can even make you look better! Check out this roundup of some of the best foods you can eat to look younger.

 

Reduce Stress

It’s probably no secret that being stressed out can wreak havoc on your health on both the inside and the outside. Too much stress can lead to things like high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and even diabetes. Stress can also affect your mood, create lack of motivation, cause sleeping problems, and fatigue. Stress may even lead to a higher risk of premature death.

Learn ways to alleviate stress to avoid these health pitfalls.  Meditation and yoga can help calm the mind, and regular exercise can be a great stress reliever. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep to conquer your days, and if you’re really down, give a friend a call to talk through it. It’s amazing what a short conversation with someone you care about can do.

 

Take up a new hobby.

Studies have shown that learning something new can help improve our memory and overall brain health. Not only that, it adds a bit of excitement and spark to life that can keep us fulfilled and happy during our golden years.

Learning something new gives us new perspective on life and opens us up to new experiences.

Need some ideas? Learning a new language, drawing, knitting, learning to play a new instrument, or even just trying out a new recipe are all great places to start.

 

Take proper care of your health.

One of the best ways to stay young is prevention. Take basic care of yourself by making sure to see your doctor and dentist regularly. Stay up to date on your health tests as you age. Get good sleep. Wear sunscreen. These are the little things you do every day that may not seem like much, but can make a big difference in the long term. 


Have any of your own tips on how to stay young? Share them with us in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

Tips For Avoiding A Sedentary Lifestyle

Tips For Avoiding A Sedentary Lifestyle

Today’s modern world moves faster than ever. And while technology has us moving at a breakneck speed in most areas of life, being active is unfortunately not one of them.

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) showed that only 23% of adults between 18 and 64 are getting the recommended amount of exercise. That’s bad news since lack of exercise can lead to lots of problems, including the development of chronic diseases, like diabetes, and cognitive delcline. In addition, a more sedentary lifestyle may lead to obesity, a condition that can contribute to incontinence (among many other things). 

What’s the recommended amount of movement you should be aiming for? Experts say that most people should try to get at least 150 minutes of moderate activity, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week. It’s also recommended to add in muscle-strengthening activities at least twice a week.

The good news is it’s never too late to start. And adding in those workouts may be easier than you think. 


Here are our 7 best ways to sneak more movement into your day:


1. Break up your workouts into chunks.

For starters, don’t feel like you have to do all your working out at once. Even breaking up your workouts into small 10-minute chunks throughout the day counts.  Have a few minutes before your next conference call? Take a walk around the block, or try going up and down the stairs a few times. Running errands? Park your car in the furthest spot from the door to force yourself to walk even just a few more steps. Waiting for the microwave to heat up your dinner? Do 30-60 second bursts of squats or pushups. These activities may not seem like much on their own, but when you add them all up they can really make a difference.

 

2. Start a walking group.

Walking is one of the best low-impact workouts you can do. It’s easy, since you can do it pretty much anywhere, and you don’t really need any equipment – just grab your sneakers and get started. What’s more, walking with a buddy keeps you more engaged throughout the exercise and will make your “workout” as easy as catching up with a friend. (Plus, you’ll get the emotional boost of some good social interaction!). Click here for tips on how to set up a walking group.

 

3. Find an active hobby you love.

Going to the gym not your thing? You don’t have to commit to a grueling workout that you hate. Try something different! Take up a tennis class, try your hand at golfing, or invest in a new bike. There are no hard rules for how you get your workout in, just find a way to move. Bonus:  if you love doing it, you’ll be more inclined to continue.

 

4. Try an alternative workout.

Maybe you’re bored with your normal gym. Or you’re starting to feel unchallenged or unmotivated by what you’ve been doing. There are tons of new gyms out there that focus on new types of workout. Orange Theory, CorePower Yoga, Barre Workouts, Crossfit, Boxing Gyms, or even Dance Centers (tap dancing anyone?) are all different types of workouts that you might consider trying.  Do a google search for what exists in your area and give one of them a call. Many of these gyms offer a free trial period so that you’re able to check it out a few times before committing.


5. Think outside the box.

Try thinking of alternatives to your normal routine in order to work in more exercise. Do you have a standing meeting with a colleague at work? Try turning it into a walking meeting and talk while you walk. Do you live close enough to walk or bike to the grocery store? Make it a habit to schedule that into your weekly routine. Feel like you just really cant squeeze anything in? Try waking up 10 minute early in the morning to fit in a few rounds of weight-bearing exercises or to take a quick walk around the block.


6. Work up to it.

It may feel daunting to jump straight into a workout routine if you’re not used to it. But you don’t have to do it all at once. Start slowly with just a few minutes per day, then work up to more time as you’re able to.  Giving your body (and, let’s face it, your mind) time to catch on may make a regular workout routine easier to stick to.

 

7. Make it a family (or friend) affair.

Working out with a group can be motivating since you’re held more accountable than if you’re just on your own. Try getting your family involved by scheduling in regular family activities.  Start taking a nightly walk after dinner with the kids. Go for hikes on the weekends. Bike to the park and get in a good jungle gym workout. Get a group of friends together to try a new workout class or gym. The best part? By getting your loved ones involved, you’ll be helping each other live a healthier life. And if you have kids, you’ll be instilling in them the importance of exercise and staying fit – something that will hopefully stay with them their whole life.

Finding a workout you can commit to will do more than help you lose weight. Staying active may help prevent chronic conditions, will give you more energy, increase your muscle tone, and help your stability, which can be especially important as you age. And, you’ll be helping your mind stay sharp while also staving off mental conditions like depression.  We’d call those pretty good reasons to make working out a priority.

So get moving! Start small (anything is better than nothing!) and use some of the tips listed above to sneak in extra movement to your day.

(Note: It’s important to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise routine. Need help finding a specialist? Click here to use our specialist locator tool!)

 

Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Surgery: Everything You Need To Know

Incontinence After Prostate Surgery

Undergoing a prostatectomy (removal of the prostate due to cancer) can be difficult. And for many men, finding that they are incontinent post surgery may come as a shock.

But rest assured that there are many treatments available to manage incontinence treatment after surgery. Read below for some of the most common questions we receive about incontinence after prostate surgery.  

What causes incontinence after prostate surgery?

Urinary incontinence is a potential side effect of prostate removal surgery. The prostate surrounds the bladder. Removing it, or using radiation to treat it, can sometimes cause damage to the nerves and muscles of the bladder, urethra, and or sphincter, which controls the passage of urine from the bladder. This can result in urinary incontinence.

Is Incontinence Normal After Prostate Surgery?

Approximately 6-8 percent of men who have had surgery to remove their prostate will develop urinary incontinence. (Cleveland Clinic) The good news is that most men will eventually regain bladder control with time.

How bad is incontinence after prostate surgery?

The degree of incontinence varies from person to person and can be anywhere from full on incontinence, to light dribbles. And, the amount you leak right after surgery will likely lessen as you continue with your recovery and any additional bladder or pelvic floor treatments you may be doing.  

How long will I have incontinence after prostate surgery?

Most men who experience a loss of bladder control have symptoms for 6 months to 1 year post prostate surgery. However, a small percentage of men may continue to experience problems past the one year mark.

Does incontinence go away on its own after prostate surgery?

For most men, urinary incontinence will go away within about 1 year. Performing pelvic floor exercises, also known as kegels, which help strengthen the muscles that are located in the base of the pelvis between the pubic bone may help to speed the recovery process along.

Does incontinence happen if I treat prostate cancer with radiation?

Some men need radiation therapy after prostate removal. During radiation therapy, some of the normal tissues around the urinary sphincter, urethra and bladder may be exposed, causing irritation to occur post therapy, leading to incontinence. This typically subsides within a few months after radiation therapy, however if it persists, additional treatments described below may be helpful.

How can I improve incontinence after prostate surgery?

Want to stop incontinence after prostate surgery? Kegels may be your answer! As mentioned above, kegels are a common treatment option for incontinence after prostate surgery.  Among other things, the pelvic floor muscles help control bladder and bowel function and, like other muscles of the body, if they get weak they are no longer able to do their job effectively.  To improve muscle function, kegels must be done regularly, every day. The good news is that they can be performed pretty much anywhere, anytime, and in a variety of positions (sitting, standing, lying down, etc.). For a complete guide on performing a men’s kegel, click here.)

Biofeedback can sometimes be used to determine if you are performing a kegel properly. And, electrical stimulation may also be used to help re-teach the muscles to contract.

What treatments are available to me if my incontinence doesn’t go away after a year?

While kegels and behavioral therapy work well for most men with mild to moderate leaking, they may not be completely effective for some. Luckily, there are still some options for treating bladder leakage after prostate surgery.

Another surgery is sometimes needed when bladder leaks persist for more than a year after surgery. This may consist of having a urethral sling procedure, or an artificial urinary sphincter.

With a urethral sling procedure, a synthetic mesh tape is implanted to support the urethra. Up to an 80% improvement has been seen with this procedure and some men stop leaking completely.

An artificial urinary sphincter is used in patients who have more severe urinary incontinence that is not improving, or for those patients who may have had a lot of damage to the sphincter muscle after prostate surgery. An artificial urinary sphincter is a mechanical ring that helps close the exit from the bladder.

As will all surgeries, these come with pros and cons and potential complications. Be sure to discuss these options with your doctor. 

Incontinence after prostate surgery forums.

Going through prostate cancer and having your prostate removed can be a physically and emotionally trying time in life. Many men are unprepared for the extent to which they may experience bladder leaks after prostate removal and it can be disheartening to have undergone surgery only to experience a loss of bladder control for a period afterward.

Fortunately, this is usually resolved within a year. During that time though, you may find that you need someone to talk to about your experience. Finding a forum or message board filled with people who can relate can help ease some of the tensions that you may be going through. 

The NAFC message boards are a great way to connect with others who may also be experiencing incontinence, due to prostate surgery or other conditions.  They’re free to join and the forum is anonymous so you can speak freely without the worry of feeling embarrassed or ashamed. NAFC is proud of this amazing group of individuals who visit the forums and courageously share their stories, offer support, and provide inspiration to each other. We encourage you to check it out!

Patient Perspective:  How Do I Tell My Wife I Have Incontinence? 

How Do I Tell My Wife I Have Incontinence?

I’ve been incontinent for 1 year now, and my wife has no idea. (At least I don’t think she does).  You see I’ve gone to great lengths to hide it from her.  It’s not like I leak all the time, but a few times a week I find myself unable to make it to the bathroom in time and I have an accident. It horrifies me, since this has never happened before.

My doctor tells me I have an enlarged prostate. This, my wife knows. I’m sure she also knows some of the symptoms, since she’s the type to do research on this stuff. But I haven’t told her I suffer from bladder leaks.

I keep spare underwear hidden in the car.  I limit my fluids when I know we’re going to be out. I always scout out the nearest restroom in case I need to make a beeline to it. I even decline certain events if I think there’s a risk I may have an accident. I feel like I’m living as a secret agent with this condition – always trying to stay 1 step ahead. 

You’re probably wondering why I haven’t told her. Talking with your spouse about something that embarrasses you is never easy. But for me, this is devastating. I’ve always been her “tough guy”. The one who fixes up old cars, goes bowling with the guys on Tuesdays, can handle pretty much anything anyone throws my way. But this is different. It’s made me feel like less of a man. And I feel embarrassed that I can’t control something as simple as my bladder.

I know it’s more complicated than that, but I just can’t help thinking “What will she think of me?”  “Will she still find me attractive?” “Will she think less of me?”

We’ve always been so spontaneous. Running out at a moments notice to meet up with friends at a pub. Jumping on those last minute flights to somewhere tropical. Going to shows and concerts and ball games. I still want to be that person. That guy who does all the fun stuff. But these bladder leaks are getting in the way of that.

I know we’re getting older, but I still just want her to look at me like she always has, and I’m so scared this will change that.

I’m planning to tell her soon. I know that it’s probably better to just get it out there, Knowing my wife, she’ll probably jump right in and try to help. She’s awesome like that.

And, I’m sure her knowing will probably be good for me. We’ll find ways to deal with it together. We’ll find solutions for this condition that I know are out there but I’ve been too stubborn or embarrassed to seek out. It will be better. She will help me make it better.

But the thought of having that conversation with her is still scary as hell.  The telling is really the hardest part of all of this. Wish me luck.

Anonymous

What To Do About An Enlarged Prostate?

What To Do About An Enlarged Prostate

Enlarged prostates are common as you age. Men aged 60 and older have a 50/50 chance of having an enlarged prostate and those who are 85 have a 90% chance. Those may be scary stats, but what exactly does having an enlarged prostate mean? Is it something to worry about? And if so, what are the treatment options? Keep reading to learn more about this very common condition and what it may mean for you.

Anatomy Review – function of the prostate

The main function of the prostate glad is to serve as a reproductive organ. It is responsible for producing prostate fluid, which is one of the main components of semen. The prostate gland muscles also help to transport semen into the urethra during ejaculation.  

The prostate gland sits just below the bladder, where the bladder and urethra (the tube that inside the penis that carries urine and semen out of the body) connect. In early life, it’s about the size and shape of a chestnut, and grows to different sizes throughout a man’s life. 

What causes the prostate to get enlarged?

As men age, the prostate gland grows. It’s estimated than as many as 17 million men have an enlarged prostate, or symptoms of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH). While it’s unclear why the prostate begins to grow, its thought that an excess of certain hormones may be to blame.

Symptoms of an enlarged prostate include the following:

  • A weak or interrupted urinary stream

  • The sudden urgency to urinate

  • Frequent urination

  • An inability to empty the bladder during urination

  • Trouble initiating urine flow, even when you feel like your bladder is full.

Should I worry? 

Even if your prostate becomes enlarged, it may never become an issue for you. The problems start when the prostate begins to constrict or block the urethra. This can compromise the bladder’s ability to effectively empty, causing chronic retention of urine. And, because the bladder still continues to send signals that it needs to empty, urgency and frequency can occur (this is also known as overactive bladder).  If left for too long, the bladder may become distended, making it even harder for it to empty completely. 

For these reasons, it’s important to see your doctor right away if you start experiencing any of the symptoms listed above. Additionally, the symptoms of an enlarged prostate can also mimic those of other conditions, such as bladder cancer or overactive bladder. Your doctor will be able to help diagnose your condition to determine an appropriate treatment.

What’s the treatment for an enlarged prostate?

There are many treatment options for enlarged prostate, depending on your symptoms.

Active surveillance, or “watchful waiting” is a term used to describe the act of monitoring your condition regularly for any changes. This approach is often used for men whose symptoms are mild and not too bothersome. 

There are several medications that are approved for BPH, but most of them fall into two categories: Alpha blockers and inhibitors. Both are effective at treating BPH and sometimes are even prescribed in combination with each other.  

Non-invasive treatment options include things like laser therapy, which decreases the size of the prostate by removing some of the tissue, or laser vaporization, which enlarges the prostate obstruction and opens the urethra.  Transurethral microwave therapy or transurethral needle ablation are other non-invasive treatment options that destroy excess prostate tissue that is causing blockage.

Finally, surgery is also commonly used to help relieve symptoms of an enlarged prostate. The most common form of surgery is transurethral resection of the prostate, or TURP. This surgery requires no incisions, relying instead on a surgical instrument inserted through the tip of your penis and the urethra. Using this tool, the doctor is able to trim excess prostate tissue that may be preventing the flow of urine. 

Other less common surgeries are also used to both trim excess tissue from the prostate, or to decrease pressure on the urethra in order to make urinating easier. You can read more about additional surgical options here.

What Causes Incontinence In Men

What Causes Incontinence In Men?

Bladder leaks can happen to anyone at any age. While we’ve been conditioned to think that mostly older women are affected by the condition, many men suffer from incontinence too. 

There are many conditions that can lead to urinary incontinence in men. But luckily there are also many ways to treat it. Keep reading to learn some of the reasons men develop leaky bladders, how it’s diagnosed, and ways to treat it.

What is urinary incontinence?

Urinary incontinence is the accidental leakage of urine. Many people wrongly assume that developing urinary incontinence is something that just happens as you age. This couldn’t be further from the truth. It can develop in anyone, at anytime. And there are several possible causes for it.

First, let’s start off with learning a bit about how everything works.

The urinary system is composed of two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. The kidneys remove waste products from the blood and continuously produce urine. The muscular, tube-like ureters move urine from the kidneys to the bladder, where it is stored until it flows out of the body through the urethra. A circular muscle, called the sphincter, controls the activity of the urethra and keeps urine in the bladder until it is time to urinate.

Normally, the bladder wall is relaxed while storing (or filling with) urine and the urethra is closed off by the sphincter. Your pelvic floor muscles also help keep the bladder outlet closed by supporting the urethra.

When the bladder is working correctly, the bladder sends signals to the brain to let you know how full it is, and to the sphincter to tell it to stay closed and prevent the bladder muscle from contracting.

When the bladder is full, you allow the pelvic floor as well as muscles at the outlet of the bladder to relax and open up. As this is happening, the muscle in the wall of the bladder (detrusor muscle) begins to contract and continues contracting until the bladder is completely emptied.

This process of bladder filling and emptying is obviously very complex. When any part of the urinary system or pelvic floor does not work correctly, incontinence can result.

If any of these signals don’t happen or get confused, bladder leakage can happen. 

What causes urinary incontinence in men?

Many things may contribute to bladder leakage in men.

The most common reason men experience incontinence is due to problems with the prostate. As men age, the prostate gland grows. It is estimated that 17 million men have an enlarged prostate, or symptoms of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH). The prostate gland wraps around the urethra (the bladder outlet), so an enlarged prostate can constrict or block the urethra. This is known as prostatic obstruction.

Prostatic obstruction can compromise the bladder’s ability to effectively empty, causing chronic retention of urine. This contributes to urgency and frequency because the bladder still signals that it needs emptying. If left untreated, the bladder can become distended, worsening its ability to contract and completely empty. It is possible to have prostatic obstruction even if the prostate is not enlarged.

Men may also experience Overactive Bladder (OAB) which is characterized by a sudden and urgent need to urinate, and needing to urinate frequently. This becomes urgency urinary incontinence when you are not able to reach the bathroom before losing control of the bladder.

Additionally, conditions that cause damage to the nerves, such as diabetes can cause bladder problems since it disrupts the normal signaling from the bladder to the brain to help control bladder function. Other conditions, such as stroke, can also cause incontinence, and even some medications or certain foods or drinks can contribute to urinary incontinence. 

How is urinary incontinence in men diagnosed? 

Before your appointment, take note of your symptoms so that you can relay them to your doctor. Symptoms of incontinence to look for are:

  • Diminished or interrupted urine flow

  • An urgent or sudden need to urinate

  • Increased frequency of urination

  • Inability to empty the bladder completely when urinating

  • Difficulty starting the urine flow, even when the bladder feels full

  • Getting up more than once per night to urinate (nocturia)

  • Accidental urine leakage

Talking to your doctor is the first step toward treatment.  At your appointment, your doctor will likely ask for your medical history, give you a complete physical examination, and provide a urine specimen. You may be asked to keep a bladder diary to record your symptoms.  Other tests to examine the bladder and/or prostate may also be necessary. 

Once your doctor has diagnosed your bladder condition, you can work together to decide on a treatment option that best fits your needs and works with your lifestyle.

What treatment options exist for men with urinary incontinence?

The good news is that there are lots of treatments available to men with urinary incontinence.  Your treatment path will depend on what is causing your condition.

For men with an enlarged prostate, your doctor may recommend medications to reduce symptoms and reduce the size of the prostate. Minimally invasive treatments, or even surgery is sometimes done to increase the flow of urine.  

Men with OAB may also be prescribed medications to help calm the bladder.  In cases where medication is not an option or isn’t working, minimally invasive treatments such as InterStim may be used.  This is an implanted device that helps to establish more normal function of the bladder by gently stimulating the sacral nerve. Behavioral modifications can also help with OAB. Changes in your diet, bladder training, and pelvic floor muscles are often used to help control urinary incontinence caused by OAB.

Many men also experience incontinence after prostate cancer surgery. When the prostate gland is removed, damage may occur to nerves, tissues, and the sphincter muscle that can impair the bladder's ability to store urine without leaking. This may last for just a few months during recovery, or longer. Depending on the severity of incontinence, there are several options that may help.  

Performing pelvic muscle exercises (kegels) are an important part of treating incontinence in men. Kegel exercise done before and after surgery can help to recover bladder control and are important for maintaining erectile function.  When done correctly, kegels can strengthen the muscles that support the bladder, causing fewer leaks, and improving bladder and bowel control. (Click here for a men’s guide to doing kegels.)

 If additional help is needed, other surgical options may be available. Your doctor can talk about the pros and cons of the various surgical options available.

Seeking Help Is The First Step

If you’re struggling with urinary incontinence, the most important thing to remember is that help is available. It’s not just a women’s issue – MANY men live with this condition too and there is no need to suffer in silence.  Talk with your doctor to learn the root cause of your bladder leakage and to find a treatment that works for you. 

Patient Perspective: Roger's Story

Rogers Story of Living With Overactive Bladder

I see it all the time – the ads for OAB, featuring these women who have to run to the bathroom every five minutes. They’re always women, right? You never see a man in these ads.  But I’m a man, and quite frankly, I feel a little left out.

I have OAB. I’ve lived with this condition for the past several years. I don’t have any known reason for it – I’ve never had prostate issues, am not on many medications, and rarely get bladder infections. But the urge to use the bathroom strikes me often and it’s pretty annoying. I usually make it in time, but have had the occasional leak. I’ve talked with my doctor about it but after he determined that my prostate was normal, he sort of brushed it off for a while – I don’t think he’s used to hearing a man come in with this type of problem unless it’s prostate related. But I finally was persistent enough that he prescribed some medication.

I experienced so many negative side effects from each medication I tried over the course of several months that I stopped them completely. It was then that my doctor finally recommended Botox. Yes, I had Botox injected into my bladder. And I have to say it was one of the best things that happened to me. It took almost no time to work, I didn’t need to use a catheter (I guess some people need to), and it lasted about 6-7 months before I had to go back in for another treatment.

It took some pushing on my part, but I was able to get treatment for my OAB. If you’re a man with this condition, don’t let it control you, and don’t believe there’s not a treatment available for you. The media and drug companies focus on women because it’s more common for them to have these types of issues, but men can have them just as easily.  And the medications and procedures work just as well for us.

Do something about your OAB. I’m so glad I persisted and got treatment for it. It helps me live a fuller life without the worry of overactive bladder.

Roger S., New York, NY

Patient Perspective: Brad's Story

Brad's Story - Opening Up About Incontinence

My friends and I are close. Growing up in a small town, we’ve always been there for each other – to joke with, lean on in hard times, and to razz each other. We have a tight-knit group of 5 and they’ve been my chosen family since I was 12. It’s hard to believe so much time has passed since our early days, but here we all are.

I experienced incontinence after having my prostate removed in 2013. It wasn’t a fun thing to go through, and I certainly didn’t enjoy it, but the one thing that made it easier was that I knew to expect it – and that I wasn’t the only one.

You see, one of my buddies in our group, Joe, had also gone through something similar a few years back. He pulled me aside before surgery and told me that the worst thing that was going to happen was that I’d probably have some leaks – maybe a lot. It had happened to him for at least a year after his surgery and he said it was “hell “.

But he told me that the thing that had made it worse was not knowing it was coming, That was why he was talking to me – he wanted to me to know that I wasn’t alone. And, if it weren’t for his advice and pick-me-up talks, I don’t know how I would have gotten through that first year.

I’ve recovered well and don’t really experience the leaks anymore. But I still talk about it. Because that’s what we should all do with those we are close to. You never know who might benefit from your experience, or who might also go through something similar and just need a friend or to know they are not alone.

Don’t let your own embarrassment get in the way of opening up to your loved ones. I’m sure glad Joe didn’t.
 
Brad T., Auburn, AL

Patient Perspective: Ethan's Story. Overcoming Adult Bedwetting

Ethan's Story of Overcoming Adult Bedwetting

I am an adult bed wetter.  Those are hard words to say for a 52 year old man. I first started experiencing nighttime leaks when I was in my teens.  Just once in awhile. I’d laugh it off with my brother.  

But as I grew further into adulthood and it kept happening, I knew it was no longer a laughing matter. I found that the problem worsened when I went away to college and I took great pains to keep it hidden from my roommate.  I dared not buy protection from the stores near my campus for fear of someone seeing me, so I would drive an hour away just to pick up whatever absorbent pads I could find, which usually were not a great fit and didn’t do a lot to protect me.  I put blankets on my bed to absorb the leaks, but they didn’t help mask the odor.  

After college I got my own place, without roommates, so I wouldn’t have to worry so much about them finding out. I finally made the decision to speak to a doctor at age 30 – nearly 14 years after suffering from this problem on and off.  

While I still don’t know the reason I wet the bed, my doctor helped me find resources to manage the condition.  After trying several different absorbent products, I finally found one that fits well and is specific to nighttime use, so I rarely wake up anymore with leaks.  

I’ve also discovered that I’m not the only one out there with this problem – NAFC’s message boards have really helped me connect with others and sharing with them has been such a relief.  After years of embarrassment and isolation, I’m so thankful to have found help and to know that I’m not alone.

Ethan S., San Jose, CA

Patient Perspective: Larry's Story

Larry's Story - Learning to manage my incontinence

I’m 68 years old and I have incontinence. I’ve suffered a lot of setbacks over the years. I lost a finger in the army. I suffer from high blood pressure. And I have an old football injury that flares up regularly. But I have never suffered as much shame and humiliation as I have since I started experiencing incontinence.

It started innocently enough - a leak here and there. My doctor said it was due to prostate problems and gave me some medication to help. It did for a while, but then the leaks flared up again and I was forced to admit that this problem was not going away.

My first trip to the grocery store to purchase incontinence pads was a doozy. Standing there, looking at the wall of options was so intimidating. What do I choose? What size? How do I know it will fit? What if it doesn’t – can I return the bag? I had so many questions and no one to ask – after all, it’s not like men just talk about peeing their pants with each other all the time. Not to mention I kept looking over my shoulder to make sure that no one I knew saw me standing there. It would be so embarrassing to be “caught” in this situation.

When I finally got home, I started trying out the various absorbent products that I had purchased. I had bought 3 different types and gave each one a fair shot for a full day before making the call. Unfortunately none of them worked so I was back to the drawing board.

Fortunately, my wife found a company online that sold different products so I gave it a shot. I don’t know why I didn’t start with this option in the first place. They offered a free consultation so I gave them a call. The rep was so helpful and it was great having a guide to walk me through the different options, and also learn more about me, my condition and my lifestyle to help find something that would work best for me.

These days, I only use online services to order absorbent products. And, I’ve found great products that help me keep my leaks controlled, and my condition under wraps so no one is the wiser.

I still don’t love having incontinence, but it’s become such a normal part of life now that it doesn’t have the same hold on me as it once did. I didn’t envision this happening to me, but am happy to know that there are resources out there to help and products available that can make it more manageable. I feel free to live my life without fear of leaks and that is something to be really proud of.

Larry B., Seattle, WA

Patient Perspective: Nick's Story

Nick's Story - Incontinence After Prostate Removal

In August of 2015, I underwent surgery to have my prostate removed.  I had been diagnosed with prostate cancer the year before and my doctor had been closely observing me since then. 

When it seemed that my cancer was growing more quickly than he liked, he suggested surgery.  “Afterall”, he said, “you’re only 63.  You can still have a long life without worrying about this.”

So, after a lot of research, I went for it.  I knew there would be complications afterward, but incontinence was not something that I had anticipated being that big of a deal.  I thought I’d probably have to wear diapers for a couple of weeks and that would be the end of it. 

Boy was I wrong. 

Nine months later and I was still having a difficult time making it to the restroom.  It was so embarrassing as a man to face this problem. I couldn’t do the things I wanted to because I was scared of having an accident or a leak, and I felt ashamed of the bulky diapers that I was forced to constantly wear. 

I finally made an appointment with a surgeon in May to discuss a sling procedure and will be having the procedure done next month.  I’m hopeful that this will be a solution for me so that I can get on with my life and get back to doing the things that are important to me. 

Nick W., Houston, TX

Patient Perspective: Samuel's Story

Samuel's Story - Getting Help For Incontinence, Enlarged Prostate

How many of you men have incontinence? How many of you would admit if you did?  It’s a hard thing to come to terms with as a man. I know, because I’m one of the "lucky ones" who has been hit with this condition.

I had been noticing the need to use the bathroom more frequently for a while, but didn’t think much of it until I was on vacation with my wife a few years ago. We were in DC, walking around, being the typical tourists, when I suddenly felt the need to go. I wasn’t totally familiar with the area, and it was crowded, so it took me a while to find a bathroom. Unfortunately, it took me too long. I leaked – just a little bit, but enough to be able to tell. Luckily, I had a sweatshirt with me so I just wrapped it around my waist and told my wife we needed to head back to the hotel.

I was so embarrassed. She didn’t understand what had happened until we got back and saw that I needed to change my pants. And even then, it was hard for either of us to comprehend what had happened – I’m a grown man! I shouldn’t be wetting myself. We both brushed it off as a fluke and went on with the rest of our trip.

But a few weeks later at the gym, it happened again. And then again while doing some yard work at home. I started to feel like my body was betraying me. Why was this happening? I didn’t tell my wife that the problem had persisted until a few months later, when it was clear that I would need to get some help. She was so understanding and helpful. She did some research online to see what may be causing it and the treatment options available, helped me find a urologist to talk to, and even came with me to my appointment.

I’m happy to say that after talking to the doctor and getting treatment, I’m doing much better. Turns out I had an enlarged prostate so I’m on medication for that and it’s greatly reduced the need to run to the bathroom every five minutes, not to mention the leaks.

This has been a very humbling experience, but I’m glad that I opened up to my wife about it and that she was so understanding and helpful. I’m not sure I would have had the strength to get to a doctor about this had it not been for her pushing me along. Now, I’m leak free and am able to travel, workout and do pretty much what I want again without having to worry.

Samuel M., Cheyenne, WY

Ask The Expert: Should Men Do Kegels?

Should Men Do Kegels?

Question: I hear about kegels for women all the time, but what about men? Can kegels benefit men too?

Expert Answer: Absolutely!  Kegels are an important part of a woman’s workout routine to prevent or manage bladder leaks, but they are just as important for men. In men, kegels can help with fecal incontinence, overactive bladder, urinary retention, erectile functioning and even orgasms.  Interested in seeing the benefits for yourself? Here’s how to do them:

How To Do Kegels For Men

There are two types of kegel exercises that you can do to strengthen and tone your pelvic floor muscles.

Long Contractions.  

Long Contractions work on the supportive strength of the muscles. To perform a long kegel contraction, tighten your pelvic muscles and hold for 5 seconds. This may be difficult at first – don’t worry if you can’t hold the contraction for the full five seconds. With practice you’ll be able to work up to this.

Overtime, work your way up to 10 seconds per contraction. Be sure to rest for 10 seconds in between each contraction – knowing how to relax your muscle is as important as the contraction.

Short Contractions.  

Short contractions work the fast twitch muscles that work quickly to stop the flow of urine and prevent leaks. To perform a short contraction, tighten your muscles quickly, then release, and repeat.

When Should I Perform Them?

Like any muscle, you don’t want to do too much too soon. Aim for 5 reps of both short and long contractions, 3x per day on your first day. As you gain more confidence and strength, work your way up to 10 reps, 3x per day of each.

Continue practicing kegels and you should see improvements in 3-6 months. And, if you find that you need some help with kegels, talk to your doctor or physical therapist. They will be able to provide you with more personal instruction, which may include biofeedback therapy.

Good luck!

Ask The Expert: How Do I Talk With My Husband About His Incontinence?

How Do I Talk With My Husband About His Incontinence

Question:  My husband of 47 years has recently started experiencing incontinent episodes. He’s a very proud man and doesn’t want to admit them to me, but it’s starting to become a problem due to the increased laundry, smell and his overall depressed attitude about it. How can I get him to open up and talk with me about it?

 

Answer:  This is a common problem in marriages, especially pertaining to men. Most men don’t want to admit they have a problem with bladder control. They feel ashamed, and hate the idea of wearing protection. He may never come out and admit it to you on his own, so here are some tips to broach the subject with him:

1. Make him feel comfortable.

As you’ve already figured out, incontinence is a very uncomfortable subject for your husband. Make him feel at ease and approach him about his bladder leakage in a way that is not threatening or accusatory. Find some neutral territory and talk to him at a time when he feels good. Don’t try to broach this subject right after he’s had an accident.  That will only make him feel more embarrassed and ashamed.

2. Show him that you are understanding and want to help him with his bladder leakage.

Before you talk with him, do a little research on incontinence and learn what may be causing the issue. Did he just have prostate surgery? Is there something else that has changed recently that could be contributing to his accidents? Read about the causes, and the many different treatment options and management strategies for bladder leakage. Show him that there are ways to manage the condition and that he doesn’t have to just live with it. Let him know that you care about him and want to help. Show him that you are a team so that he doesn’t feel so alone.

3. Encourage him to seek treatment for his incontinence.

Incontinence can often be a symptom of an underlying condition. Let your husband know that you want him to talk with a doctor to make sure that there is nothing serious going on, and to help him get the problem under control. He may be resistant to speaking with his doctor, but press on (slowly). The sooner he confronts his incontinence with a professional, the sooner he can begin treatment and start feeling like himself again. (Find a specialist in your area with our Specialist Locator.)

4. Be his advocate for care.

Because your husband is so embarrassed about his incontinence, you may need to be his voice when seeking out treatment options. Help him research incontinence so that you both can learn more about it. Write out questions that he can bring with him to the doctors office to ensure he doesn’t forget anything important. Be sure to voice any concerns over treatment options. And help him stay the course on his path to treatment.

5. Introduce him to the NAFC message boards.

The NAFC message boards are a great place for your husband to explore and ask questions – anonymously! There are many people on the boards who may be experiencing the same things he is who he can talk to. Plus, with so many people dealing with incontinence in the same spot, there are lots of learnings and tips he may be able to pull from to help his own situation. (As an aside, the message boards may also be a great spot for you to do some research too.  Talk with other caregivers to get some ideas. Or ask other men living with incontinence how you might be able to best approach your husband about the topic.)

It’s never easy talking about incontinence to a loved one – especially men. But by being a caring and supportive spouse, you’ll show your husband that you are in his corner, and that you are there to help. Good luck!

It's Bladder Health Awareness Month, 2017!

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Hello Readers!

Each year, NAFC, along with several other health organizations, celebrates Bladder Health Awareness Month by raising awareness of the many conditions that can affect the bladder and how to treat it. This is an important month for NAFC – while we touch many people each day, it’s estimated that over 25 million Americans live with incontinence. And many of those people wait years before even having a conversation with their doctor about treatment options. It’s a debilitating condition that can cause shame, embarrassment, isolation and depression for those it touches, and, unfortunately, it is widely (and incorrectly) thought to be a condition that people should just accept as they get older. This couldn’t be further from the truth and this month, it’s our chance to shine the spotlight on the condition and show people that living with incontinence is no way to live.

So, what can you expect this month from NAFC? A lot!

Here’s a rundown of how we’re doing our part to stop the stigma:

Life Without Leaks Awareness Campaign.

NAFC launched the Life Without Leaks Campaign earlier in 2017 and it’s still going strong! Designed to show men and women of all ages that they don’t have to live with bladder leaks, this campaign sheds light on the effects of incontinence and shows people that by not treating their incontinence, they may be missing out on the best parts of their life. Life is possible without leaks. Check out the campaign here.

Blog Series: The Lifecycle of Incontinence.

This series will break down the stages of incontinence, from learning to accept you have the condition, to a description of the many treatment options available to you. Follow along on the BHealth Blog each week as we discuss the following topics:

  • Week 1: Learning To Accept You Have Incontinence
  • Week 2: What You Can Do To Manage Your Condition Before You See Your Doctor.
  • Week 3: How To Talk To Your Doctor About Incontinence
  • Week 4: Your Guide To Treatment Options.

BE STRONG Classes. 

Our BE STRONG classes are designed to show you the many benefits of maintaining a strong and healthy pelvic floor. All of our classes are taught by Pelvic Floor Specialists and are a great way for you to learn more about this vital group of muscles. Find one in your area!

How You Can Get Involved

Follow Us On Facebook and Twitter – and help us raise awareness! 

Not only will you be able to follow along with everything that’s happening this month, you can help us raise awareness by liking and sharing our posts. Better yet – post our Bladder Health Facts to your own pages! Be sure to tag us with the hashtags #LifeWithoutLeaks and #BHealth!

Make A Donation To NAFC. 

We love doing what we do. And we make a pretty big impact, reaching over 1,000,000 people each year who need our help.

But we can’t do it alone.

Support from our readers is the only way we’re able to continue offering the education and community we’ve created on nafc.org. It’s how we’re able to continue creating free courses for your local communities. It’s how we’re able to advocate for patients in home and at assisted care facilities for quality incontinence supplies. It’s how we provide thousands of free educational brochures to patients looking for help. And it’s how we are able to increase the awareness of the impact of incontinence on those it touches. Donate today to help us ensure everyone has access to these free materials, and can learn how to live a #LifeWithoutLeaks.

Start A Fundraiser On Facebook! 

We know sometimes it’s hard to give. But if you’re passionate about our cause and want to help, consider setting up a fundraiser for us on Facebook. It’s super easy to do and all the funds come straight to NAFC. Read our step-by-step instructions on how to do it here.  With #GivingTuesday coming up on the 28th of this month, it’s a great time to get this going.

So there you have it!  We hope you’ll follow along with us this month to learn more about incontinence and help support us throughout the month to increase awareness of Bladder Health! 

Sincerely,

The National Association For Continence

Men And Kegels - The Ultimate Guide

Men's Ultimate Guide To Kegels

Kegel exercises have long been associated with women – something that they do during pregnancy and post childbirth to tone up their pelvic floors and prevent or ease incontinence symptoms. But Men, if you haven’t tried kegels, you’re truly missing out. Not only can they help ease bladder leakage if you have it, experts claim that they can also give you a stronger erection and orgasm. Want to learn more? Keep reading.

What are Kegels and what muscles do they work?

Kegels are basically the contracting of the muscles in your pelvic floor. Your pelvic floor is comprised of a tightly woven web of muscles, located in the base of the pelvis between the pubic bone and tailbone. These muscles have three main functions:

  1. They help support the pelvic organs such as the bladder, the intestines and the rectum.

  2. They help control bladder and bowel function and can prevent or ease symptoms of bladder leakage.

  3. They are involved in sexual functionality.

As with any other muscle in the body, if they get weak, they can no longer perform their job. These muscles can naturally stretch and become weaker over time, but with proper exercise they can remain strong to ensure good sexual and bladder health and function.

How do kegels benefit me? 

Kegels can address a number of issues that men may face related to their bladder or bowel.

Bladder Leaks. 

Urinary incontinence is a condition that affects as many as 15% of men aged 15-64, and may be caused by a number of health conditions. The most common cause of incontinence in men is due to problems with the prostate, but other conditions can affect bladder function as well. Incontinence in men can range from a small amount of leakage after urination, or more substantial leaking when performing physical activity or placing stress on the bladder (laughing, coughing, working out, lifting heavy items).  A Kegel regimen can help to tone these muscles to prevent the leaks from happening.

Fecal Incontinence.

As with urinary incontinence, weakening of the pelvic floor muscles can also affect the anus and rectum, resulting in loss of bowel control. But, kegel exercises can help to tone and strengthen this area up as well to prevent bowel leakage.

Overactive Bladder.

You’ve probably seen a million pharmaceutical commercials for what’s known as Overactive Bladder – the urgent and frequent need to empty your bladder. When you have an overactive bladder, the muscles of the bladder contract involuntarily, creating an urgent need to urinate. Performing kegels can help improve control of these muscles, improving, or even eliminating the chance bladder leakage.

Urinary Retention.

Ever had difficulty starting a stream of urine? How about a weak flow, and the feeling that you need to urinate again right after you’ve finished? It could be urinary retention, which is usually caused by a blockage in the urinary tract, or nerve problems that interfere with signals between the brain and the bladder.  Bladder retraining is one method that can be used to help fix this, but kegels can also help the nerves and muscles used in emptying the bladder to work better.

Erectile Functioning.

Erectile Dysfunction, or ED, can be caused by many physical conditions (heart disease, diabetes), or can be the result of surgery (like prostate removal) or trauma. The good news is that you don’t have to resort to medications to treat it – kegel exercises can help strengthen your muscles in your pelvic region and regain normal function. In men, kegels specifically help strengthen the bulbocavernous muscle.  This is the muscle that is responsible for erections, contractions during orgasm and ejaculation, and emptying the urethra after urination. Studies have found that regular practice of kegels can keep this muscle strong, and if you’re experiencing problems, kegels may improve your symptoms.

Ejaculation & Orgasm. 

Again, this goes back to the bulbocavernous muscle – the stronger the muscle, the stronger the contractions you’ll have during orgasm. Enough said.

How do I do a kegel?

First, you need to locate the right muscles, which is often the hardest part. The next time you’re urinating, try stopping the flow mid-stream. If you can do that, you’ve found the right muscle. (But don’t do this on a regular basis – this should only be done when trying to locate the correct muscles.)

There are two types of kegel exercises that you can do to strengthen and tone your pelvic floor muscles.

Long Contractions.  Long Contractions work on the supportive strength of the muscles. To perform a long kegel contraction, tighten your pelvic muscles and hold for 5 seconds. This may be difficult at first – don’t worry if you can’t hold the contraction for the full five seconds. With practice you’ll be able to work up to this.

Overtime, work your way up to 10 seconds per contraction. Be sure to rest for 10 seconds in between each contraction – knowing how to relax your muscle is as important as the contraction.

Short Contractions.  Short contractions work the fast twitch muscles that work quickly to stop the flow of urine and prevent leaks. To perform a short contraction, tighten your muscles quickly, then release, and repeat.

How Often Should I Do Kegels?

Like any muscle, you don’t want to do too much too soon. Aim for 5 reps of both short and long contractions, 3x per day on your first day. As you gain more confidence and strength, work your way up to 10 reps, 3x per day of each.

It may take time to see changes, but consistency is key here. Continue practicing kegels and you should see improvements in 3-6 months. And, if you find that you need some help with kegels, talk to your doctor or physical therapist. They will be able to provide you with more personal instruction, which may include biofeedback therapy.

Men, Here Are 5 Reasons You May Be Experiencing Bladder Leaks.

men bladder leaks

Women sometimes get all the attention when talking about bladder problems. And while it’s true that bladder leakage affects more women than men, that doesn’t mean men are free from the condition. In fact, studies suggest that as many as 15% of men living at home between the ages of 15 to 64 are affected by incontinence. 

Here are 5 of the top reasons men may experience bladder leakage.

1. You Have A Prostate Problem. 

By far, conditions affecting the prostate account for the majority of problems in men with incontinence. Enlarged prostate (Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, or BPH) can constrict or block the urethra, compromising the bladder’s ability to effectively empty. This can cause urgency and frequency since the bladder still signals that it needs emptying. And, for men who have had prostate removal surgery due to prostate cancer, urine leakage is common during the first six weeks after surgery. After that, roughly 20% of men may continue to have a significant problem with leakage, or stress urinary incontinence.

2. You’re Overweight.  

Excess weight can place extra pressure on the bladder, which, combined with loss of muscle control, can lead to leakage. If you’re overweight and experiencing bladder leaks, try losing a few pounds – even a small amount can make a big difference. And your overall health will benefit too.

3. You Have Diabetes (or another neurological condition).

happens when there is a lack of bladder control due to a brain, spinal cord or nerve problem. This can be caused by a number of conditions, such as diabetes, MS, Parkinson’s disease, or spinal cord injury. Treatment options vary depending on your symptoms, but they do exist and should be seen to.

4. An Obstruction In Your Urinary Tract.

Again, this is most often caused by an enlarged prostate in men, but can also be due to a blood clots, tumors, bladder stones, or even scarring of the urethra caused by injury or surgery.  Blockage can cause urine to build up, leading to trouble urinating, leakage, and even distended bladder.

5. What You’re Consuming.

While what you eat or drink may not directly cause bladder leaks, if you’re already to prone to them, certain things you consume can make your symptoms worse. Excessive alcohol, certain medications, and caffeine all act as diuretics and can cause you to need to use the restroom more often. Other foods, like citrus foods, artificial sweeteners, and citrus foods can irritate the bladder, causing an increase need to go to the bathroom. This, combined with an existing bladder problem can lead to more leaks.

Men can sometimes have a difficult time speaking up about bladder issues, even to their doctor. And initial treatment options, such as using adult absorbent products, can seem foreign and uncomfortable.  But living with incontinence is no way to live, especially with so many treatment options available to you. If you struggle with #bladderleakage, learn more about your condition, and talk to your doctor about the options that exist for you so that you can continue to live the life you want.

Need help finding a physician who treats incontinence? Use our Doctor Finder Tool!

Your Guide To The New Prostate Screening Guidelines

Prostate Cancer Screening Guidelines

The new guidelines on prostate cancer screening have left some men wondering what they should do. Here’s a quick breakdown on what the US Preventative Services Task Force recommends.

Prostate cancer is the 3rd leading cause of cancer death in men in the US, with about 1 in seven men being diagnosed in their lifetime.   You may have recently heard the news that, despite previous cautions against getting screened for prostate cancer, new recommendations from the US Preventative Services Task Force are now recommending that men ages 55 to 69 at least have a discussion about prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening, including the risks that go along with it.  So, what’s the deal? Will the test help or hurt you?

It depends. Back in 2012, the USPSTF recommended no routine screening at any age, because of the potential harm that could result after testing, including:

  • False Positives: A fair amount of PSA testing has suggested that prostate cancer may be present when there is in fact no cancer. Elevated PSA levels can be caused by many other things that don’t have anything to do with cancer. This can lead to worry and anxiety, and follow up tests that may not be needed.
  • Risk of infection with additional tests. In order to dig deeper after a PSA test, follow-up tests are done, which can potentially cause complications (fever, infection, bleeding, urinary problems, and pain).
  • Even if prostate cancer is diagnosed correctly, it sometimes never causes a problem for men. However, it’s difficult to tell what cancers will, or won’t be an issue later on, so most of the time, aggressive treatment is performed.
  • Treatment for prostate cancer can lead to other side effects, including erectile dysfunction, or urinary or fecal incontinence.

Due to these potential risks, the USPSTF recommended against screening men, since the benefits of screening really didn’t really outweigh the expected harm that could result. What has changed? 

The US Preventative Services Task Force now recommends that men ages 55 to 69 years of age should talk with their doctor about the potential benefits and harms of PSA screening for prostate cancer, and should make individualized decisions on how to proceed. This decision was made after determining that the potential benefits and harms of PSA tests are closely balanced in men ages 55 to 69. However, men over 70 are still recommended to not receive PSA screening.

Really, what all this boils down to is you. No longer should you just ignore the test if you are within the 55-69 age range. After all – it has been shown that of 1,000 men screened, testing may prevent up to 1 to 2 deaths from prostate cancer and up to 3 cases of metastatic prostate cancer over the course of 13 years.

But, you should weigh your options. Have an open dialogue with your doctor about your specific risks – your background and health history, your lifestyle, your healthcare beliefs and wishes – these are all important factors to take into consideration when deciding if and when to get tested.

You should also talk with your doctor about what the course of action would be if your PSA levels do turn out to be on the high side. While this could be a sign of cancer, it may also be caused by something else, such as enlarged prostate, which can be treated.

In the end, the Task Force is really just recommending a discussion. Which is something you should be having with your doctor anyway. Talk with your doctor about the risks so that together you can make an educated decision about your options.

Ask The Expert: Are There Other Things Besides Prostate Trouble That Can Cause Incontinence In Men?

Prostate Trouble and Incontinence

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: Are There Other Things Besides Prostate Trouble That Can Cause Incontinence In Men?

AnswerProstate problems in men typically get the blame for incontinence issues for good reason – many men experience issues with their prostate (BPH, prostate cancer) which can often cause incontinence, even if it’s just for a brief time. But there are other conditions that may be contributing to the root of the issue as well. Being overweight can put extra pressure on the bladder, which may cause leaks. Certain foods can also irritate the bladder, causing incontinence – especially if you’re already prone to the condition.  Additionally, neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s or diabetes can lead to neurogenic bladder, where the brain is unable to communicate properly with the bladder. Even still, urinary tract infections or blockages can lead to bladder troubles.

The most important thing to consider is that incontinence is generally a symptom of something else, and can almost always be treated. If you’re experiencing bladder leaks, see your doctor today and ask for help. Your doctor will be able to dig deeper to find the root cause of your incontinence and work with you to find a solution.   

Are you an expert in incontinence care? Would you like to join the NAFC expert panel? Have a question you'd like answered? Contact us!